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Evenings with an Author: Sebastian Faulks, Where My Heart Used to Beat 

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Wednesday 17 February 2016, 19:30


Location 
 The American Library in Paris
Category  Adults

 

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Sebastian Faulks, the 2012 Library gala speaker, presents his latest novel Where My Heart Used to Beat. 

On a small island off the south coast of France, Robert Hendricks, an English doctor who has seen the best and the worst the twentieth century had to offer, is forced to confront the events that made up his life.

His host, and antagonist, is Alexander Pereira, a man whose time is running out, but who seems to know more about his guest than Hendricks himself does. 

The search for sanity takes us through the war in Italy in 1944, a passionate love that seems to hold out hope, the great days of idealistic work in the 1960s and finally – unforgettably – back into the trenches of the Western Front. 

About the author

faulks Sebastian Faulks is the author of critically-admired and best-selling novels, including his French Trilogy, Birdsong, Charlotte Gray, and The Girl at the Lion d’Or, and a leading man of letters in his native Britain. Faulks recently wrote and hosted an acclaimed BBC television series about significant characters in British novels, “Faulks on Fiction,” which was then published as a book of the same name.

Faulks was born in 1953 in Donnington, Berkshire. After high school in Britain, he spent a year studying in Paris and was a member of The American Library. He then enrolled at Emmanuel College, Cambridge, from which he graduated in 1974. In addition to the trilogy, his novels include A Week In December a Sunday Times number one bestseller; Engleby; Human Traces; On Green Dolphin Street; A Fool’s Alphabet; Jeeves and the Wedding bells; and Devil May Care. The latter book grew from a request by the family of the late Ian Fleming to write a one-off James Bond novel to mark the centenary of Fleming’s birth in 2008. 

 

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